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Learn a word today!

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  • Reply to: What's that word?: Chuudoku (poisoning / addiction)   5 years 3 weeks ago

    I think the word sought after is either 悪癖 or 悪趣味 (although the latter is a bit different). 悪癖 could be used to describe, for example, picking one's nose... that kind of bad habit.

  • Reply to: Five Japanese words that don't mean what you think they mean   5 years 1 month ago

    what certain words mean. great article thank you.

  • Reply to: Five Japanese words that don't mean what you think they mean   5 years 2 months ago

    What anime websites do you guys use? I use: http://www.animeflicks.net

  • Reply to: About Homejapan.com   5 years 2 months ago

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    to david cameron investigate after she admitted failing to disclose her business relationship with Abid Hussain.
    Mr Cameron has said he is" confident that the full details had not been invited to the Downing Street machine.

  • Reply to: About Homejapan.com   5 years 4 months ago

    Its like you learn my mind! You appear to grasp a lot approximately this,
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  • Reply to: Debunked: "kaizen = Japanese philosophy of continuous improvement"   5 years 4 months ago

    Hello! I must have given a wrong impression somehow:

    The only contention I would take up with this article is the comment that kaizen has nothing to do with Japanese.

    Nothing to do with Japanese? The kaizen I discuss is a pure Japanese word, 100%, no questions about it! Is there a line in the article that appears to say otherwise? If so, I'll quickly fix it –

  • Reply to: Debunked: "kaizen = Japanese philosophy of continuous improvement"   5 years 4 months ago

    The only contention I would take up with this article is the comment that kaizen has nothing to do with Japanese. Not entirely true. it is true that there is no Japanese philosophy called Kaizen, but the word kaizen is a Japanese word borrowed from Chinese roots words much like languages sometimes borrow from other languages

  • Reply to: Debunked: "kaizen = Japanese philosophy of continuous improvement"   5 years 4 months ago

    Hello! Let me jump in there:

    Since it becomes a 'standard of practice' to apply to problems the continous nature of the word may not be encapsulated within it's linguistic structure ... it has no 'imperfective continual structure' so to speak, but being a standard of practice in real world practice, the continual nature becomes assumed.

    I believe that's what I pointed out: that a word like "exercise" can typically be taken to imply an ongoing series of actions, not a single action. Such continous action may not be part of the word's definition. But it often can be assumed part of actual usage, as you note. That certainly holds for "improvement" (or "kaizen" if you will); we humans practice improvement continuously. We've been keeping it up for tens of thousands of years, after all! 

    So no disagreement there. Here, though, is where I have to answer assertions with questions:

    The Japanese people have taken (as they often have, and to great effect) 改善 and risen to an art in and of itself, and to the point that it takes on a life of it's own,

    "An art in and of itself" with "a life of its own"? No point in my arguing for those claims or against them, as I don't know how you define these terms, and how you'd measure an abstract concept like "improvement" to see whether it reaches a nebulous point labeled "art in and of itself". It's outside the topic of my article, though, so I'll leave it alone.   

    and truly becomes 日本語 in and of itself.  

    Well, yes, the word kaizen is 日本語 (Japanese); that's what I'm writing about. No argument there!

    The Japanese concept of 改善 and the American concept of continuing to improve, are light-years apart in terms of approach.  

    Again, I have to chuck that aside. Aside from whether I'd agree with it or not (how exactly is this parsecs-long yardstick for "terms of approach" calibrated?), my article isn't saying that the "Japanese concept" and "American concept" of kaizen are or aren't similar. That's not my topic...

    It's not a 'myth' because of the Japanese approach "improvement"...

    This gets to my topic. Which, rather unambitiously, is nothing more than this: 

    If you see the claim that "The word 改善, in the Japanese language, refers to a Japanese philosophy of continuous improvement"...

    ... that is a myth. The word in Japanese truly doesn't mean that; please check the dictionaries to confirm for yourself. That's all I'm saying, as a matter of linguistic trivia (and rather trivial myth-busting). 

    Which brings me to your first sentence (sorry for the reordering):

    but I believe it is a GROSS exaggeration and simplification to say:  "All corporations practice 改善, it just means static improvement".

    I would certainly disagree with that statement too, so let me know if you hear someone say it!

    The English word Kaizen can mean whatever you and I and other English speakers agree upon, and that might very well include philosophical and continuous aspects. But for what it's worth, the Japanese word 改善 does not mean "static improvement". Or "continuous improvement". Or necessarily anything high-falutin' philosophical. It just means "improvement", whether static, continuous, part of a philosophical system, or one-shot-and-forgotten. That's just how people here in Japan use the word.

    Thanks for the input!

  • Reply to: Debunked: "kaizen = Japanese philosophy of continuous improvement"   5 years 4 months ago

    It's origin was yes, Chinese ... what is really a 'center' of Asian thought when it comes to living.With respect, but I believe it is a GROSS exaggeration and simplification to say:  "All corporations practice 改善, it just means static improvement".  Since it becomes a 'standard of practice' to apply to problems the continous nature of the word may not be encapsulated within it's linguistic structure ... it has no 'imperfective continual structure' so to speak, but being a standard of practice in real world practice, the continual nature becomes assumed.The Japanese people have taken (as they often have, and to great effect) 改善 and risen to an art in and of itself, and to the point that it takes on a life of it's own, and truly becomes 日本語 in and of itself.  The Japanese concept of 改善 and the American concept of continuing to improve, are light-years apart in terms of approach.  It's not a 'myth' because of the Japanese approach "improvement"The strength of Americans to this concept ... is that they combine their contact with the Japanese with their own natural drive for innovation and originiality, and Americans have adapted this to be a standard of corporate practice. 

  • Reply to: Five Japanese words that don't mean what you think they mean   5 years 5 months ago

    since when is popeye is considered anime, well whatever.

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